For The Love Of Antique Art Glass

I have long loved and appreciated Antique art glass. There are so many beautiful artistic pieces to choose from long, delicate, graceful shapes or a brilliant cranberry red or delicately intricate design. Collecting antique art glass in the 21st C. is getting more difficult but can be fun and  rewarding as well.  artglass4

The techniques and chemistry of making antique art glass had been known in Europe since the early 19th century, and the increased ability to mass produce items in the early 1900’s enabled designers such as Rene Lalique to produce millions of pieces. But, it wasn’t until many British and Bohemian glass makers emigrated in the 1850’s that America became interested in the process.

The boom in American art glass did not begin until 1883 when Joseph Locke of the New England Glass Company invented and patented a new method of shading colored glass by reheating it, known as Amberina. Amberina is a transparent glass which contains gold powder giving it an amber color, but when the glass is reheated the amber color changes to ruby red.

artglass3Locke’s method was copied by the Mt. Washington Glass Company in America later giving it the name Rose Amber of which is very difficult to distinguish from Locke’s antique art glass pieces. This new development created an increased interest among glass designers to explore and experiment with glass more as an art form and as a sculptural material.

Many new methods and techniques were created and art glass production exploded, producing beautiful new designs, colors and surfaces, appealing to new buyers and giving the collector a variety of beautiful pieces to choose from. Antique art glass includes cameo glass, Burmese, Mercury glass, Albertine, enameled glass, and Peach Blow to name a few. Many of these same techniques have continued to be used by contemporary glass makers.

amberinag Victorian Amberina New England Glass Company

 

 

 Resource Antique Central general information and history of antiques and collectibles.

Surviving In The 21 Century Antiques Market

In our shop we sell everything from old family snapshots for $1 a each to 18th-century chairs $500 ea. There have been more young people buyinbooksg antiques,though few are interested in fine furniture and china, a sign of changing tastes and lifestyles. Most shoppers are seeking unique and unusual items of every era, things that they can use in their homes. We have to educate young folks that everything old can be new again and breath new life into items by repurposing.

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Our business is constantly evolving, the internet has changed how we do business, and Antique Shops have to evolve along with the changing times, styles and trends of the 21 century.

There are fewer antiques stores than there were a few decades ago,  but there are still  new stores popping up and thriving. Downtown Mesa Vintage District is a perfect example with 8 shops along one block on Main Street.When you have a lot of stores in one area, then you have a destination, and you draw customers.

 

6 Vintage Holiday Gift Ideas

  1. Vintage Christmas Ornaments ~ Great Vintage one-of-a-kind holiday decorations, make an excellent gift. Whether you are looking for early 20th century blown glass ornaments, a hand-made Santa doll, bubble Christmas lights, or the perfect star for your tree, you can find it by doing a little treasure hunting this season at Michelle’s Antiques and the other Vintage Shops in Downtown Mesa.ornaments
  2. Wrist and Pocket Watches ~ Men’s watches are crazy expensive at retail jewelry shops, especially pocket watches, instead get him a vintage watch this Christmas.pocketwatch
  3. Pearls ~ A classic gift for her. Every woman needs a set of genuine pearls. They dress up anything from a T-shirt to a little black dress. Whether in classic white or a beautiful dyed colors, pearls are the way to a woman’s heart.pearls
  4. Bar ware ~ Who wouldn’t like a cut glass or silver plated ice bucket to give the holiday party a bit of style?  wineglasss
  5. Vintage Toys, Dolls & Books ~ Toys from Christmas past and beautiful old books make excellent gifts. When picking books  look for classics with great cover designs. ginnydolls.michelles.antiques.dollsbarnumset3
  6. Vintage Fashion ~  Vintage  Beaded Hand Bags, Leather Purses make excellent gifts..29417649_1288458374624728_3331379520442728448_n Continue reading 6 Vintage Holiday Gift Ideas

A Brief History of the Ouija Board

A Brief History of the Ouija Board

As a method of supposed communication with the spirit world, the Ouija board has terrified countless slumber partying children and served as a plot vehicle in a number of Hollywood films. Here’s where it came from.

Spiritualism and Pre-Ouija Methods

Ouija boards have their roots in Spiritualism, which began in the United States in the late 1840s. (Claims that ancient Ouija boards existed are unfounded.) The new movement was led by mediums, who claimed to be intermediaries between the living and the dead.

There were a number of ways mediums made followers believe that they were communicating messages from those who had passed. One, table turning, involved the table moving or knocking on the floor in response to letters called out from the alphabet. Another method used planchettes, heart-shaped devices with two wheels at one end and a pencil at the point; users would place their fingers on the device, which would then be guided by spirits who would “write” messages.

Both methods were problematic. Table turning took too long, and planchette writing was hard to decipher. According to the Museum of Talking Boards, some mediums got rid of these methods altogether, preferring to channel while in a trance, while others built complicated tablesdials, and tables painted with letters that required people to use a planchette as a pointer. This method became the most popular—and paved the way for the Ouija board.

Rise of The Talking Board

In 1886, the New York Daily Tribune reported on a new talking board being used in Ohio. It was 18 by 20 inches and featured the alphabet, numbers, and the words yes, no, good evening, and goodnight; the only other necessary object was a “little table three or four inches high … with four legs” that the spirits could use to identify letters. The brilliance of the board was that anyone could make it—the tools suggested in the article are “a jack-knife and a marking brush.”

Operating the board was similarly easy:

You take the board in your lap, another person sitting down with you. You each grasp the little table with the thumb and forefinger at each corner next to you. Then the question is asked, ‘Are there any communications?’ Pretty soon you think the other person is pushing the table. He thinks you are doing the same. But the table moves around to ‘yes’ or ‘no.’ Then you go on asking questions and the answers are spelled out by the legs on the table resting on the letters one after the other.

(Of course, any messages generated probably weren’t from spirits; instead, they were likely a result of the Ideomotor effect. This psychological phenomenon was first described in 1852 by William Benjamin Carpenter who, in a scientific paper analyzing how talking boards worked, theorized that muscular movement can be independent of conscious desires.)

Ouija: The Game

These types of talking boards became very popular, and in 1890, Elijah Bond, Charles Kennard and William H.A. Maupin had the idea to turn the board into a toy. They filed the first patent for a game they called the Ouija board, which looked and operated much like the talking boards in Ohio; the patent was granted in 1891. The name, according to Kennard, came from using the board, and was an ancient Egyptian word meaning “good luck.” The Kennard Novelty Company manufactured the boards, which were made of five pieces of wood across the face braced by two vertical slats on the back; they retailed for $1.50.